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Tuesday, May 24

  1. page home edited {homepagecollage.jpg} {homepagecollage2.jpg}
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  2. page Essay(Nicole) edited The Book in The Back of the Library Now a day, Nowadays, due to These stories that are worth…

    The Book in The Back of the Library
    Now a day,Nowadays, due to
    These stories that are worth telling are told with depth beyond the obvious. They are our history, woven from many generations into a small paperback, $3.00 book at Borders. These stories are art. They are a person’s thoughts and emotions painted in vivid greens and blues upon a canvas. You never read about the ocean. You hear the waves, smell the seaweed and taste the salt on your lips. A good story does not lecture you in the ways of good and bad. They do not threaten you by telling you a tale of what happens to the bad guy when the hero comes along. They have no moral in which to teach. They simply wish you think. Think about the world and see it through different eyes.
    Water for Elephants is not one of those stories you would find in the back of the library. Not because it was not worth telling, but because it was so good, it was able to move itself to the Best Sellers section. This book introduces itself with such detail, you find yourself becoming a part of Jacob’s world. You are not listening to his life, you are experiencing it.
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  3. page Essay(Johann) edited Stories A Story Lacking Audience The worthiness of a story is a subject against which all aut…

    StoriesA Story Lacking Audience
    The worthiness of a story is a subject against which all authors struggle. Some may say that it is defined by the meaning behind the story, or possibly even the moral delivered at the end. Some conclude that if a story doesn’t have a lesson, it isn’t worth writing. Although these are all important components of a story, none of them are as important as the interest of the audience. Even after recounting the conclusion to a story full of morals, twists, and meaning, a story would just be a worthless clutter of words if the audience did not care.
    In Water for Elephants, Mr. Jankowski often reflects on the meaning of his life and how he has never shared his amazing stories with his family or friends. In one account, he mutters to himself, “My platitudes don’t hold their interest and I can hardly blame them for that. My real stories are all out of date. So what if I can speak firsthand about the Spanish flu, the advent of the automobile, world wars, cold wars, guerrilla wars, and Sputnik – that’s all ancient history now,” (144). This quote illustrates his realization that, without an audience that gives a damn, his stories mean nothing. However, later in the story, he comes across a man in the circus that values his narrative. The man, realizing that he was in the middle of one of the biggest circus disasters in history, says, “You’re a living piece of history, and I’d surely love to hear about that collapse firsthand,” (396). Because he was part of a modern circus, he bore the interest and respect that made Mr. Jankowski’s story finally worth telling.
    A Story Lacking Audience is Nothing but Dissonance
    Because the worth of stories is determined by the interest of the audience, it is hard to determine whether most stories should be told or not. From a subjective and objective standpoint, Water for Elephants was an excellent novel well worth the read. The novel sparked much interest in me, capturing me from the very beginning and holding me close until the final pages in the author’s notes. Objectively, it was a story worth telling because it piques the interest of young readers who have yet to realize how fleeting time can be so impacting on our lives.
    The story relates to the life of the readers, who are just starting out in the world, while also beckoning forward to days to come, bearing forewarnings as well as comforts, as illustrated in this quote from the novel, “All eyes are trained on me. ‘What?’ I say loudly. ‘Is that so much to ask? Doesn’t anyone else here miss real food? Surely you can’t all be happy with this . . . this . . . pap?’ I put my hand on the edge of my plate and give it a shove,” (93). This line exemplifies both the frustration and drive to overcome age that occurs alongside getting older. Everyone does or will struggle with this problem in old age, which makes it an easy problem with which the readers can identify. These similarities between the audience and the story are what make Water for Elephants a book of the highest excellence, alongside its themes in romance, poverty, friendship, sympathy, time, and human determination.
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  4. page home edited WIKI WORK Group Key: Johann Nikki Grace Character page (COMPLETELY DONE): Conflict Page (COM…
    WIKI WORK
    Group Key:
    Johann
    Nikki
    Grace
    Character page (COMPLETELY DONE):
    Conflict Page (COMPLETELY DONE)
    Plot page (ALMOST DONE!):
    Setting page (COMPLETELY DONE):
    Symbol page (COMPLETELY DONE):
    Theme page (COMPLETELY DONE):
    *Nikki: home page collage
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  5. page Essay(Nicole) edited The Book in The Back of the Library ... Will Bella Chose?! Choose?! What you These stori…

    The Book in The Back of the Library
    ...
    Will Bella Chose?!Choose?! What you
    These stories that are worth telling are told with depth beyond the obvious. They are our history, woven from many generations into a small paperback, $3.00 book at Borders. These stories are art. They are a person’s thoughts and emotions painted in vivid greens and blues upon a canvas. You never read about the ocean. You hear the waves, smell the seaweed and taste the salt on your lips. A good story does not lecture you in the ways of good and bad. They do not threaten you by telling you a tale of what happens to the bad guy when the hero comes along. They have no moral in which to teach. They simply wish you think. Think about the world and see it through different eyes.
    Water for Elephants is not one of those stories you would find in the back of the library. Not because it was not worth telling, but because it was so good, it was able to move itself to the Best Sellers section. This book introduces itself with such detail, you find yourself becoming a part of Jacob’s world. You are not listening to his life, you are experiencing it.
    The best thing about Water for Elephants is that it makes you think about time. All the chapters about Mr. Jankowski has you thinking about how you might feel when you get old or what it will be like when you get up one morning, look in the mirror and find an old decrepit face staring back at you from where your face should be. Things like this are what makes Water for Elephants and other fantastic stories worth telling.

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  6. page Essay(Nicole) edited nicole's essay PASTE HERE The Book in The Back of the Library Now a day, due to the overwhelming…
    nicole's essay PASTE HEREThe Book in The Back of the Library
    Now a day, due to the overwhelming amount of books, articles, blogs and other things to read, it can be very hard to find a good story, something worth the time you take to read it. You can no longer just look for a good story; you have to dig, through miles of trash and useless mumble jumble. The best stories are the ones in the back of the library, where the lights flicker and it smells a bit like mildew and old paper. These are the stories, legends, and narratives people ignore because of their boring, normal looking covers. That is because good stories are masters of disguise. They portray themselves as dull, tedious works and you find yourself walking, if not sprinting towards the section that reads, Edward Cullen, Jacob Black. Who Will Bella Chose?! What you don’t know is that if you venture back to that dusty old section and check out one of those dusty old books, you will find yourself swept into a world you never could have imagined on your own.
    These stories that are worth telling are told with depth beyond the obvious. They are our history, woven from many generations into a small paperback, $3.00 book at Borders. These stories are art. They are a person’s thoughts and emotions painted in vivid greens and blues upon a canvas. You never read about the ocean. You hear the waves, smell the seaweed and taste the salt on your lips. A good story does not lecture you in the ways of good and bad. They do not threaten you by telling you a tale of what happens to the bad guy when the hero comes along. They have no moral in which to teach. They simply wish you think. Think about the world and see it through different eyes.
    Water for Elephants is not one of those stories you would find in the back of the library. Not because it was not worth telling, but because it was so good, it was able to move itself to the Best Sellers section. This book introduces itself with such detail, you find yourself becoming a part of Jacob’s world. You are not listening to his life, you are experiencing it.
    The best thing about Water for Elephants is that it makes you think about time. All the chapters about Mr. Jankowski has you thinking about how you might feel when you get old or what it will be like when you get up one morning, look in the mirror and find an old decrepit face staring back at you from where your face should be. Things like this are what makes Water for Elephants and other fantastic stories worth telling.

    (view changes)
  7. page Essay(Johann) edited Stories Lacking Audience is Nothing but Dissonance The worthiness of a story is a subject agai…

    Stories Lacking Audience is Nothing but Dissonance
    The worthiness of a story is a subject against which all authors struggle. Some may say that it is defined by the meaning behind the story, or possibly even the moral delivered at the end. Some conclude that if a story doesn’t have a lesson, it isn’t worth writing. Although these are all important components of a story, none of them are as important as the interest of the audience. Even after recounting the conclusion to a story full of morals, twists, and meaning, a story would just be a worthless clutter of words if the audience did not care.
    In Water for Elephants, Mr. Jankowski often reflects on the meaning of his life and how he has never shared his amazing stories with his family or friends. In one account, he mutters to himself, “My platitudes don’t hold their interest and I can hardly blame them for that. My real stories are all out of date. So what if I can speak firsthand about the Spanish flu, the advent of the automobile, world wars, cold wars, guerrilla wars, and Sputnik – that’s all ancient history now,” (144). This quote illustrates his realization that, without an audience that gives a damn, his stories mean nothing. However, later in the story, he comes across a man in the circus that values his narrative. The man, realizing that he was in the middle of one of the biggest circus disasters in history, says, “You’re a living piece of history, and I’d surely love to hear about that collapse firsthand,” (396). Because he was part of a modern circus, he bore the interest and respect that made Mr. Jankowski’s story finally worth telling.
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